Center for Compassionate Touch LLC
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How's Your Touch?

Posted by: Ann on Friday, November 8, 2013 at 12:00:00 am

Why intention is so important to touch.  I’ve found that when I take care of the quality of my touch at the beginning of a session that I’m more fulfilled by the experience. What's the quality of your touch? How might you enhance it?

I Can't, I'm Going to Winfield.

Posted by: Ann on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 at 11:00:00 pm

There are some things in life that so nourish our souls that they should become non-negotiable. As someone whose career is taking care of others that's a commitment to my own wellness. Massage therapists, nurses, social workers, family caregivers, chaplains, you name it—we’re all in the same boat when it comes to self-care.  How we each “do” self-care is a personal choice. For me, it’s Winfield!

Comforted by- a Robot?

Posted by: Ann on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 12:00:00 am

Human interaction, care or comfort is not a one-way street. I don’t think a machine, no matter how cute, cuddly and real-like it is, can ever take the place of human connection.  Something happens to us when we give a moment of ourselves to someone in need of kindness. It comes right back to us- sometimes two-fold. Watching an old person interact with a robot turns compassion into entertainment.

Haunted by Frank- and Why I do What I do

Posted by: Ann on Tuesday, July 2, 2013 at 12:00:00 am

I'm being haunted by the memory of a man who touched me deeply.  I met Frank in a nursing home last week where I was teaching a six-day Compassionate Touch® workshop.  I first noticed him because he wasn't particularly old -- at least not by skilled nursing facility standards-- and he was tall and muscular. He was sitting in a corner in the hallway near the nurses’ station. By his appearance, I was pretty sure he had suffered a stroke some time back.

What Would be in Your Time Capsule?

Posted by: Ann on Monday, May 27, 2013 at 12:00:00 am

If I created a personal time capsule, what would I put in it? What would I want to tell those who opened it one or two hundred years from now? I think it’s a question worth a little attention. Perhaps the ideas that come are the things we cherish most about ourselves and our lives. I’ve met quite a number of people over the age of 100 during my work with hospice and eldercare patients. I wonder if they have a time capsule buried somewhere. Wouldn’t it be a wonderful experience to take a centenarian to open his own capsule?